Author: Michaela Jubilo

A Learner-Centered Syllabus Helps Set the Tone for Learning

At its most basic level, the syllabus is used to communicate information about the course, the instructor, learning objectives, assignments, grading policies, due dates, the university’s academic integrity statement, and, in some cases, an increasingly long list of strongly worded admonitions on what is and isn’t acceptable behavior in the college classroom. For some faculty, the syllabus is a contract between them and their students, complete with a dotted line where students sign their name indicating they consent to the terms of the agreement. Lolita Paff, an associate professor at Penn State Berks, is a reformed syllabus-as-a-contract believer. “I...

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Flipped Classrooms and Flipped Lessons: What Does It Mean for Parents?

What is a flipped classroom? A flipped classroom flips, or reverses, traditional teaching methods. Traditionally, the teacher talks about a topic at school and assigns homework that reinforces that day’s material. In a flipped classroom, the instruction is delivered online, outside of class. Video lectures may be online or may be provided on a DVD or a thumb drive. Some flipped models include communicating with classmates and the teacher via online discussions. The recorded lecture can be paused, rewound, re-watched and forwarded through as needed. Then, class time is spent doing what ordinarily may have been assigned as homework....

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How Do Our Own Learning Experiences Shape Our Approach To Teaching?

Introduction  My learning experiences from childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood have shaped my approach to teaching today.  These learning experiences have shown me great examples of what to do, and of what not to do when considering how to conduct assessment of student performance and achievement in my own classroom.  As a result of a powerful learning experience I had in the third grade, I have decided to make all of my expectations for my students very clear.  I plan to distribute analytic rubrics along with every assignment.  Due to an influential learning experience I had in the eighth...

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Teacher as a Leader

Special Education has always been a second fiddle in the Educational System.  Thus, as a special educator, I have to contribute to show that special educators are equally important staff as well as the general educators and other specialists in contributing to the success of each learner and in building the foundation in the Educational System at any school district. Dr. Nancy Blair stated that “mindful leadership is a process of influence that nurtures the capacity of self, others and the system to achieve a goal” (Laureate, 2007).  Truly an effective teacher leader entails lots of responsibilities.  As a...

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Accelerate Learning in Your Classroom

  While using station teaching or acceleration centers as an approach to co-teaching is often very successful for both teachers and students, it is important to use this approach correctly.  To help those co-teachers already using, or thinking about implementing, an acceleration center approach in their classroom, here are: Tips for Successful Acceleration Centers Reassign partners every four to five weeks. Don’t change partners in response to student requests or complaints. Doing so opens up a Pandora’s box of potential problems. Acceleration Center assignments must be able to be managed and completed independently. If students cannot manage the assignments...

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